Empowered Community

Congratulations Fray Lázaro!

1307

Brigade Volunteers

1566

Medical Patient Consultations

139

Dental Patient Consultations

25

People with Access to Clean Water

87

Loans Disbursed

114

Eco-Stoves Constructed

111

Latrines Constructed

57

Trained Community Leaders

Fray Lázaro

  • Overview
  • Medical
  • Dental
  • Engineering
  • Water
  • Business
  • Public Health

Overview

Fray Lázaro is a community of approximately 650 people living in 130 homes. It belongs to the municipality of Choluteca in the department of Choluteca. Fray Lázaro is primarily an agricultural community producing corn for sustenance. There is a percentage of the population who work in construction or for nearby shrimp or sugarcane processing companies. This is generally day labor and does not provide steady employment. There is a rural health center (CESAR) in Fray Lázaro providing medical consults with a nurse. Similarly, there is a primary school in Fray Lázaro, which has kindergarten through 6th grade. The nearest secondary school is in Choluteca, so students continuing on to middle school must travel about 30 minutes by bus.

Municipality: Choluteca

Department: Choluteca

Homes : 130
Population : 550
Water System : Yes
Community Bank : Yes
Electricity : Yes
Health Center : In Community
Community Health Workers : Yes
% of Homes with Latrines : 85%
Eduaction : Up to 6th Grade
Distance from Lodging Facility : 45 minutes

Medical

Program Status

  • Planning
  • Active
  • Complete

HEALTH CARE ACCESS:

As a larger rural community, Fray Lázaro has a CESAR community health center located within the community. It is not consistently staffed with nurses or doctors, but there is now a partnership with the community health workers to be able to provide medical attention and health care to community members year-round.

83

Brigade Volunteers

1566

Patient Consultations

101

Pap Smears Performed

39

Health Education Workshops

COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKERS & PHARMACY:

Fray Lázaro is in the process of creating a community pharmacy, led by Community Health Workers that the Global Brigades Medical Team trained in 2015. Not only do these CHWs promote health and offer consultations with all community members, but they are opening the pharmacy to be able to sell basic medications to their community at a fair price. This means community members won’t have to travel to the nearest town to buy medication.

BRIGADE INFORMATION:

Medical brigades use the Fray Lázaro health center as their brigade site. Doctors spend an average of 10 minutes with each patient and we are able to provide 4-5 educational charlas a day.

  • AVERAGE PATIENTS ATTENDED: 174
  • NEARBY COMMUNITIES: JOCOMICO, CERRO MORAZAN, MORILLAS, PALO HERRADO, COPAL, CALERO COPAL, CENON ROJO, SANA ELENA
  • BRIGADE SITE: SCHOOL

MEDICAL BRIGADES IN FRAY LÁZARO:

Chapter Date # Of Volunteers Chapter Date # Of Volunteers
Columbia University January 2013 20 University of Birmingham UK August 2015 41
Brown University January 2014  21

Dental

Program Status

  • Planning
  • Active
  • Complete

DENTAL CARE ACCESS

In working closely with the medical program, the dental program provides fillings, extractions, and fluoride treatments as a standard part of medical brigades. Most community members do not have regular access to dental care due to the lack of dentist within a reasonable distance.

139

Patient Consultations

444

Fluoride Treatments

79

Fillings Performed

24

Dental Education Workshops

BRIGADE INFORMATION:

Dental brigades use the Fray Lázaro health center as their brigade site. The health center was designed with brigade structure in mind and therefore is very conducive to running mobile clinics. It is a 2 story building with 6 rooms and a large open meeting area. Doctors spend an average of 10 minutes with each patient and we are able to provide 4-5 educational charlas a day. Each brigade sees an average of 24 dental patients per day.

AVERAGE PATIENTS ATTENDED: 24
NEARBY COMMUNITIES: JOCOMICO, CERRO MORAZAN, MORILLAS, PALO HERRADO, COPAL, CALERO COPAL, CENON ROJO, SANA ELENA
BRIGADE SITE: SCHOOL

DENTAL BRIGADES IN FRAY LÁZARO:

Chapter Date # Of Volunteers Chapter Date # Of Volunteers
Columbia University January 2013 20 University of Birmingham UK August 2015 41
Brown University January 2014  21

Engineering

Program Status

  • Planning
  • Active
  • Complete

FRAY LÁZARO’S ENGINEERING CHALLENGE:

Although most of homes in the community of Fray Lázaro have access to a centralized water system constructed by the government in 1980 and subsequently renovated in 1999, those living in the neighborhood of Los Zimarros are not connected to the system as they built their homes following its completion. Thus, roughly 40 community members living in 11 houses lacked access to a sufficient supply of potable water. They had to carry their water from nearby streams and wells to their homes. Given the difficulties inherent to collecting water, community members often lacked a sufficient supply, which forces them to forgo many basic hygiene and sanitation practices that would protect their health and well-being.

Further endangering their health, few community members treated their water prior to consuming it. There is no centralized water treatment plan, which greatly increases their risk of contracting water-borne disease. The majority of community members do not treat the water in their homes either. Thus, there are very high rates of water-borne disease in Los Zimarros.

NA

Brigade Volunteers

25

Beneficiaries

6.6

Kilometers of Pipeline Designed

NA

Average Community Volunteers

FRAY LÁZARO’S ENGINEERING SOLUTION:

Water Brigaders from several different universities began working in Fráy Lazaro in June 2014. Throughout the next few months, volunteers worked with community members to: construct a 1,500 gallon storage tank with chlorinator; dig approximately 660 meters of trench and lay pipeline; connect approximately 11 houses to the system; provide educational seminars to children in the community on water and health related topics.

To ensure the sustainability of the project, a new seven member Water Council was established and trained by Water Brigades in addition to a Basic Sanitation Committee.

Water

Program Status

  • Planning
  • Active
  • Complete

FRAY LÁZARO’S WATER CHALLENGE:

Although most of homes in the community of Fray Lázaro have access to a centralized water system constructed by the government in 1980 and subsequently renovated in 1999, those living in the neighborhood of Los Zimarros are not connected to the system as they built their homes following its completion. Thus, roughly 40 community members living in 11 houses lacked access to a sufficient supply of potable water. They had to carry their water from nearby streams and wells to their homes. Given the difficulties inherent to collecting water, community members often lacked a sufficient supply, which forces them to forgo many basic hygiene and sanitation practices that would protect their health and well-being.

Further endangering their health, few community members treated their water prior to consuming it. There is no centralized water treatment plan, which greatly increases their risk of contracting water-borne disease. The majority of community members do not treat the water in their homes either. Thus, there are very high rates of water-borne disease in Los Zimarros.

23

Brigade Volunteers

25

Project Beneficiaries

6.6

Kilometers of Pipeline Installed

1,500

Storage Tank Volume (gallons)

FRAY LÁZARO’S WATER SOLUTION:

Water Brigaders from several different universities began working in Fráy Lazaro in June 2014. Throughout the next few months, volunteers worked with community members to: construct a 1,500 gallon storage tank with chlorinator; dig approximately 660 meters of trench and lay pipeline; connect approximately 11 houses to the system; provide educational seminars to children in the community on water and health related topics.

To ensure the sustainability of the project, a new seven member Water Council was established and trained by Water Brigades in addition to a Basic Sanitation Committee.

WATER BRIGADES IN FRAY LÁZARO:

Chapter Date # Of Volunteers Chapter Date # Of Volunteers
UC Santa Barbara June 2014 12 Explore Water Brigades June 2014 4
University of Chicago June 2014  7

Business

Program Status

  • Planning
  • Active
  • Complete

FRAY LÁZARO’S ECONOMIC CHALLENGE

The people of Fray Lazaro are hard working and engage themselves in a wide variety of activities to be able to maintain their families. Most households have their own small plot of land where they grow corn and beans, which they keep for themselves as their main source of nourishment. Only some families are able to harvest enough for sale and profit. Many community members work by the day for the standard pay of 100 Lempiras (around USD 4.25) as masons or peasants on others’ land, but this is far from representing a stable and predictable source of income. Some workers obtain seasonal jobs in the neighboring shrimp processing or sugar cane factories, or work as cooks or waiters in the restaurants located in the nearby beaches. Nevertheless, most households struggle to make a living.

116

Brigade Volunteers

87

Loans Disbursed

2

Microenterprises

$10,580

Capital Investment

FRAY LÁZARO’S MICROFINANCE SOLUTION

The Global Brigades Business and Microfinance Team trained a new community bank in Fray Lázaro in 2014. They also brought Microfinance and Business brigades in order to strengthen both the knowledge and the credit of the community bank, fostering the opening of more savings accounts, gathering more seed capital, and enabling the bank to start giving out loans to community members.

FRAY LÁZARO’S BUSINESS SOLUTION

In addition to the community bank, community members started two new businesses in the community. The first is a bakery, led entirely by women who were inspired to start their own business after speaking to another women’s microenterprise from another part of the country. The women have been trained in business administration and commercial baking techniques. They are in the beginning stages of their bakery. The second business is a community pharmacy, led by Community Health Workers that the Global Brigades Medical Team trained in 2015. Not only do these CHWs promote health and offer consultations with all community members, but they are opening the pharmacy to be able to sell basic medications to their community at a fair price. This means community members won’t have to travel to the nearest town to buy medication.

BUSINESS BRIGADES IN FRAY LÁZARO:

Chapter Date # Of Volunteers Chapter Date # Of Volunteers
Mount Allison February 2015 11 Penn State University March 2016 15
UCONN & USC  March 2015  36 University of Calgalry  March 2016 11
University of Calgary  May 2015  12

Public Health

Program Status

  • Planning
  • Active
  • Complete

FRAY LÁZARO’S PUBLIC HEALTH CHALLENGE

Many community members in Fray Lázaro lacked the resources needed to improve their homes and prevent disease caused by unsafe living environments.  Prior to Public Health Brigades, only 25% of homes had washable latrines. Similarly, the majority of homes had dirt floors and utilized traditional wood burning stoves, causing both parasitic disease and respiratory infection. Although community members in Fray Lazaro recognized the problems inherent to their living environments, they did not have the economic resources nor the technical knowledge needed to address them.

1085

Brigade Volunteers

114

Eco-Stoves Constructed

111

Latrines Constructed

143

Floors Laid

FRAY LÁZARO’S PUBLIC HEALTH SOLUTION

Public Health Brigaders from several different universities and the Public Health Brigades in-country team began work in Fray Lázaro in May 2014. Since this time, volunteers and staff members have worked with community members to identify community leaders and train them to form the Basic Sanitation Committee; increase cultural sensitivity and awareness by working side-by-side with qualified masons and project beneficiaries; conduct educational workshops emphasizing the importance of sanitation and hygiene in local primary schools; and build over eco-stoves, latrines, hygiene stations, and hundreds of square meters of cement floor.

To ensure the sustainability of the in-home infrastructure projects, the Public Health Program provides continuous follow-up in the community. Clear responsibilities and powers are assigned to each member of the Basic Sanitation Committee, making the beneficiaries themselves an even stronger stakeholder of the Public Health projects.

PUBLIC HEALTH BRIGADES IN THE COMMUNITY:

Chapter Date # Of Volunteers Chapter Date # Of Volunteers
Loyola University May 2014 16 Wayne State August 2014 36
Emory University May 2014 14 University of New Brunswick  August 2014 15
University of Oklahoma & USC May 2014 15 Oregon Health & Sciences University August 2014 17
University of Missouri May 2014 21 Imperial College London September 2014 19
University of Michigan May 2014 15 Dublin City University October 2014 21
Arizona State University May 2014 36 DePaul University December 2014 26
San Jose State University May 2014 17 Saint Louis University January 2015 24
UC Berkeley May 2014 12 Loyola & UVA January 2015 30
Illinois Wesleyan June 2014 12 UC Berkley January 2015 31
University of Washington June 2014 11 Columbia, Boston, John Hopkins, & Mizzou University January 2015 37
UC Santa Barbara, UC Santa Cruz, & UC Los Angeles June 2014 35 Mount Allison University January 2015 15
UC Riverside June 2014 13 UNC Chapel Hill, Duke University March 2015 25
Marianopolis College & Kings College London June 2014 31 UC San Diego March 2015 28
Memorial University of Newfoundland August 2014 30 Acadia University April 2015 22
New York University August 2014 15 University of Calgary May 2015 9
University of Birmingham UK August 2014 41 Boston University May 2015 10
Loyola University May 2015 13 Temple University May 2015 23
Tulane University May 2015 23 UC Berkeley, San Jose State, ASU May 2015 26
Dublin City University, UT Austin May 2015 23 SUNY Stony Brook June 2015 15
Marianapolis College June 2015 22 Memorial University of Newfoundland 57
Birmingham July 2015 18 Miami Dade & Wayne State August 2015 36
Rutgers University August 2015 26 University of Toronto August 2015 45
Dublin City University January 2016 15 St Olaf COllege  January 2016 11
St Olaf College February 2016 24 St Francis Xavier University February 2016 11
UNC Chapel Hill March 2016 12

Local Reference Points

View the map to see the closest volunteer lodging facilities, hospitals, and other relevant points of reference.

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