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Volunteer Tools / Brigader Resources / Safety & Insurance / Safety Precautions «

For Travel Emergencies:

During business hours, contact the GB International Office at 1-206-489-4798 or by email at admin@globalbrigades.org. For after-hour support, please contact the on-call Chapter Advisor at  1-206-596-0014 (for urgent matters only).

See Travel FAQ for information about cancellations/delays. 

Safety Precautions

Honduras

Please review Global Brigades' most recent response to Safety in Honduras.

The safety of the student volunteers is Global Brigades' number one priority and is the single most important consideration when entering a community or choosing a project. Each country that Global Brigades serves has implemented safety protocols and policies to decrease any risk of danger and to ensure that any emergency can be properly handled in a prompt and professional manner. The Global Brigades entity in Honduras has the responsibility of administering regular risk assessments of the current political situation, the location of lodging facilities and communities, and transportation provided to volunteers. Look to the left to find our frequently asked questions tab with answers related to safety.

It is important to keep in mind that the communities we work in are largely isolated and far away from major cities where crime is more prevalent. Global Brigades has years of relationships built with communities served and is very aware of the safety situation of each community that we work in. We urge parents and volunteers to understand that crime committed in the major cities of the countries we work in does not mean that the entire country is unsafe. For example, if there was a riot in downtown Dallas, we would not assume that the entire state of Texas is unsafe and that the people in Houston are at risk. Please consider the nature of our work in isolated areas when reading any negative press about the danger of the countries that we are working in. Should you have any questions or concerns about Global Brigades' safety please contact the volunteer's Chapter Advisor by emailing admin@globalbrigades.org.

 

See FAQ

 

What kind of security and staff is provided?

Every group is accompanied by at least one trained Brigade Coordinator, a full logistics team, and trained drivers. In Honduras, groups are also accompanied by a police officer and military soldiers to the work site as a precautionary measure.

While in the community, Brigade Coordinators are in charge of maintaining a professional and safe work environment for the volunteers and the community. All coordinators are trained to assist first aid emergencies at the locations. Special transportation is on-call 24/7 during the brigade in case of major emergencies or complete evacuation from the location.

What is the relationship with the local government and police?

GB Honduras has had very strong and formal relationships for the past 6 years with the U.S. Embassy, Honduran National and Local Police, and the national military in Honduras. All the entities above are aware and supportive of volunteer activities and have worked together successfully for years to support the volunteers. Furthermore, GB's community projects are only done in rural areas where crime is low (if barely existent) and where relationships have been long established.

 

GB Panama works directly with the National Ministry of Health to implement all health programs and is supported and nationally recognized by the US Embassy. GB Panama has formed a strong relationship with local police, municipalities, and community representatives in the region.

 

GB Nicaragua works directly with the National Ministry of Health to implement all health programs and is supported and nationally recognized by the US Embassy. GB Nicaragua has formed a strong relationship with local police, municipalities, and community representatives in the region.

 

What is the involvement of U.S. Embassy and Department of State?

The U.S. Department of State is contacted by the Global Brigades Advising Team and is provided with the names of volunteers travelling and the exact regions of where they will be staying through the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP). Additionally, Global Brigades in-country entities are in close contact with the Embassy and are notified of any safety advisories.

What criteria does GB Honduras use when selecting transportation vendors?

 

All vendors must be in full compliance with all local laws and regulations required by the government in order to transport passengers.  All vehicles being provided must be recent models and in excellent working condition.  All drivers must possess the appropriate special driver's license that is required by the Honduran government, qualifying them to drive the types of buses that are being provided. In order to obtain this license, drivers have to pass a special driving test administered by the government.  Lastly, Global Brigades Honduras only works with established vendors in the transportation field who have extensive experience in the business of transporting passengers.

 

Are the communities safe?

Before entering a community, the GB Research and Evaluation (R&E) team collects baseline data, assesses community needs and secures buy-in from the local leadership. Each community is visited by the Executive Director and transport/logistics team of the GB in-country team to ensure that it is secure and safe for transporting the volunteers to and from the community. If the GB in-country leadership team ever feels that the safety of volunteers is compromised in any way, volunteers would be immediately withdrawn from the community.

 

How accessible are the communities?

All communities must be accessible through paved roads or well maintained dirt roads (used mostly during summer) by normal vehicles or four wheel drive. The driving time to the location is approximately 30 minutes to 3 hours from where the volunteers are staying.

Has there ever been any security related incident?

Global Brigades has an exceptional track record for brigade security because of the involvement of local law enforcement, hired security, and strong relationships with local communities leaders. Groups have only experienced incidents typical of any international travel, such as petty theft. Any and all incidents are recorded taken note of for improvements to safety. Terrorist or guerrilla groups are not present in the communities served and no Global Brigades group has been threatened by them.

 

Are the students ever alone?

Students are never left alone; they have GB staff members accompanying them and are told to never wander off alone. During the last day of the brigade the groups may have the option to visit a tourist town to purchase souvenirs and have lunch. Here, the students are always instructed to stay within the town and to always be with a group.

What if the group has to be evacuated?

In the event the volunteers must be evacuated, there is an established Emergency Evacuation Plan in place. All volunteers are covered by the GB Emergency Evacuation Insurance Policy. The in-country Program Associates will work with the Brigade Coordinators, local embassy, and airlines to ensure that the group departs immediately and safely.

Who do I contact in case of an emergency?

If there is an emergency situation where the family needs to get a hold of the volunteer immediately, please contact the appropriate team members listed below:

 

Emergency Travel Contact:

• GB International Office, during business hours, 1-206-489-4798, or email admin@globalbrigades.org

• For after-hour support, please contact the on-call Chapter Advisor at 1-206-596-0014 (for urgent matters only)

 

Honduran Contacts:

• Luis Quan –Chief Executive Officer of Global Brigades Honduras, +504-9488-7997 (Honduran Mobile)

 

Panama Contact:

• Gabriela Valencia - Chief Executive Officer of Global Brigades Panama, +507-6083-1756 (Panamanian Mobile)

 

Nicaragua Contacts:

• Mario Quan - Interim Executive Director of Global Brigades Nicaragua, +505-5842-3566 (Nicaraguan Mobile)

• Wilmer Arostegui - Operations Director of Global Brigades Nicaragua, +505-8539-5320 (Nicaraguan Mobile)

Panama

The safety of the student volunteers is Global Brigades' number one priority and is the single most important consideration when entering a community or choosing a project. Each country that Global Brigades serves has implemented safety protocols and policies to decrease any risk of danger and to ensure that any emergency can be properly handled in a prompt and professional manner. The Global Brigades entity in Panama has the responsibility of administering regular risk assessments of the current political situation, the location of lodging facilities and communities and transportation provided to volunteers. Look to the left to find our frequently asked questions tab with answers related to safety.

It is important to keep in mind that the communities we work in are largely isolated and far away from major cities where crime is more prevalent. Global Brigades has years of relationships built with communities served and is very aware of the safety situation of each community that we work in. We urge parents and volunteers to understand that crime committed in the major cities of the countries we work in does not mean that the entire country is unsafe. For example, if there was a riot in downtown Dallas, we would not assume that the entire state of Texas is unsafe and that the people in Houston are at risk. Please consider the nature of our work in isolated areas when reading any negative press about the danger of the countries that we are working in. Should you have any questions or concerns about Global Brigades' safety please contact the volunteer's Chapter Advisor by emailing admin@globalbrigades.org.

 

See FAQ

 

What kind of security and staff is provided?

Every group is accompanied by at least one trained Brigade Coordinator, a full logistics team, and trained drivers. In Honduras, groups are also accompanied by a police officer and military soldiers to the work site as a precautionary measure.

While in the community, Brigade Coordinators are in charge of maintaining a professional and safe work environment for the volunteers and the community. All coordinators are trained to assist first aid emergencies at the locations. Special transportation is on-call 24/7 during the brigade in case of major emergencies or complete evacuation from the location.

What is the relationship with the local government and police?

GB Honduras has had very strong and formal relationships for the past 6 years with the U.S. Embassy, Honduran National and Local Police, and the national military in Honduras. All the entities above are aware and supportive of volunteer activities and have worked together successfully for years to support the volunteers. Furthermore, GB's community projects are only done in rural areas where crime is low (if barely existent) and where relationships have been long established.

 

GB Panama works directly with the National Ministry of Health to implement all health programs and is supported and nationally recognized by the US Embassy. GB Panama has formed a strong relationship with local police, municipalities, and community representatives in the region.

 

GB Nicaragua works directly with the National Ministry of Health to implement all health programs and is supported and nationally recognized by the US Embassy. GB Nicaragua has formed a strong relationship with local police, municipalities, and community representatives in the region.

 

What is the involvement of U.S. Embassy and Department of State?

The U.S. Department of State is contacted by the Global Brigades Advising Team and is provided with the names of volunteers travelling and the exact regions of where they will be staying through the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP). Additionally, Global Brigades in-country entities are in close contact with the Embassy and are notified of any safety advisories.

 

What criteria does GB Panama use when selecting transportation vendors?

 

All vendors must be in full compliance with all local laws and regulations required by the government in order to transport passengers.  All vehicles being provided must be recent models and in excellent working condition.  All drivers must possess the appropriate special driver's license that is required by the Panamanian government, qualifying them to drive the types of buses that are being provided. In order to obtain this license, drivers have to pass a special driving test administered by the government.  Lastly, Global Brigades Panama only works with established vendors in the transportation field who have extensive experience in the business of transporting passengers.


Are the communities safe?

Before entering a community, the GB Research and Evaluation (R&E) team collects baseline data, assesses community needs and secures buy-in from the local leadership. Each community is visited by the Executive Director and transport/logistics team of the GB in-country team to ensure that it is secure and safe for transporting the volunteers to and from the community. If the GB in-country leadership team ever feels that the safety of volunteers is compromised in any way, volunteers would be immediately withdrawn from the community.

 

How accessible are the communities?

All communities must be accessible through paved roads or well maintained dirt roads (used mostly during summer) by normal vehicles or four wheel drive. The driving time to the location is approximately 30 minutes to 3 hours from where the volunteers are staying.

Has there ever been any security related incident?

Global Brigades has an exceptional track record for brigade security because of the involvement of local law enforcement, hired security, and strong relationships with local communities leaders. Groups have only experienced incidents typical of any international travel, such as petty theft. Any and all incidents are recorded taken note of for improvements to safety. Terrorist or guerrilla groups are not present in the communities served and no Global Brigades group has been threatened by them.

 

Are the students ever alone?

Students are never left alone; they have GB staff members accompanying them and are told to never wander off alone. During the last day of the brigade the groups may have the option to visit a tourist town to purchase souvenirs and have lunch. Here, the students are always instructed to stay within the town and to always be with a group.

What if the group has to be evacuated?

In the event the volunteers must be evacuated, there is an established Emergency Evacuation Plan in place. All volunteers are covered by the GB Emergency Evacuation Insurance Policy. The in-country Program Associates will work with the Brigade Coordinators, local embassy, and airlines to ensure that the group departs immediately and safely.

Who do I contact in case of an emergency?

If there is an emergency situation where the family needs to get a hold of the volunteer immediately, please contact the appropriate team members listed below:

 

Emergency Travel Contact:

• GB International Office, during business hours, 1-206-489-4798, or email admin@globalbrigades.org

• For after-hour support, please contact the on-call Chapter Advisor at 1-206-596-0014 (for urgent matters only)

 

Honduran Contacts:

• Quique Rodriguez –Chief Executive Officer of Global Brigades Honduras, +504-9970-9478 (Honduran Mobile)

• Luis Quan – Chief Operations Officer of Global Brigades Honduras, +504-9488-7997 (Honduran Mobile)

 

Panama Contact:

• Gabriela Valencia - Chief Executive Officer of Global Brigades Panama, +507-6083-1756 (Panamanian Mobile)

 

Nicaragua Contacts:

• Mario Quan - Interim Executive Director of Global Brigades Nicaragua, +505-5842-3566 (Nicaraguan Mobile)

• Wilmer Arostegui - Operations Director of Global Brigades Nicaragua, +505-8539-5320 (Nicaraguan Mobile)

Nicaragua

The safety of the student volunteers is Global Brigades' number one priority and is the single most important consideration when entering a community or choosing a project. Each country that Global Brigades serves has implemented safety protocols and policies to decrease any risk of danger and to ensure that any emergency can be properly handled in a prompt and professional manner. The Global Brigades entity in Nicaragua has the responsibility of administering regular risk assessments of the current political situation, the location of lodging facilities and communities, and transportation provided to volunteers. Look to the left to find our frequently asked questions tab with answers related to safety.

It is important to keep in mind that the communities we work in are largely isolated and far away from major cities where crime is more prevalent. Global Brigades has years of relationships built with communities served and is very aware of the safety situation of each community that we work in. We urge parents and volunteers to understand that crime committed in the major cities of the countries we work in does not mean that the entire country is unsafe. For example, if there was a riot in downtown Dallas, we would not assume that the entire state of Texas is unsafe and that the people in Houston are at risk. Please consider the nature of our work in isolated areas when reading any negative press about the danger of the countries that we are working in. Should you have any questions or concerns about Global Brigades' safety please contact the volunteer's Chapter Advisor by emailing admin@globalbrigades.org.

 

 See FAQ

 

What kind of security and staff is provided?

Every group is accompanied by at least one trained Brigade Coordinator, a full logistics team, and trained drivers. In Honduras, groups are also accompanied by a police officer and military soldiers to the work site as a precautionary measure.

While in the community, Brigade Coordinators are in charge of maintaining a professional and safe work environment for the volunteers and the community. All coordinators are trained to assist first aid emergencies at the locations. Special transportation is on-call 24/7 during the brigade in case of major emergencies or complete evacuation from the location.

What is the relationship with the local government and police?

GB Honduras has had very strong and formal relationships for the past 6 years with the U.S. Embassy, Honduran National and Local Police, and the national military in Honduras. All the entities above are aware and supportive of volunteer activities and have worked together successfully for years to support the volunteers. Furthermore, GB's community projects are only done in rural areas where crime is low (if barely existent) and where relationships have been long established.

 

GB Panama works directly with the National Ministry of Health to implement all health programs and is supported and nationally recognized by the US Embassy. GB Panama has formed a strong relationship with local police, municipalities, and community representatives in the region.

 

GB Nicaragua works directly with the National Ministry of Health to implement all health programs and is supported and nationally recognized by the US Embassy. GB Nicaragua has formed a strong relationship with local police, municipalities, and community representatives in the region.

 

What is the involvement of U.S. Embassy and Department of State?

The U.S. Department of State is contacted by the Global Brigades Advising Team and is provided with the names of volunteers travelling and the exact regions of where they will be staying through the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP). Additionally, Global Brigades in-country entities are in close contact with the Embassy and are notified of any safety advisories.

 

What criteria does GB Nicaragua use when selecting transportation vendors?
 
All vendors must be in full compliance with all local laws and regulations required by the government in order to transport passengers.  The transportation provider that GB Nicaragua works with is certified by the Ministry of Tourism in the transportation of passengers.  All vehicles being provided must be recent models and in excellent working condition.  All drivers must be at least 30 years of age and possess the appropriate special driver's license that is required by the Nicaraguan government, qualifying them to drive the types of buses that are being provided. In order to obtain this license, driver's have to pass a special driving test administered by the government which qualifies them to work as professional bus drivers.  Lastly, Global Brigades Nicaragua only works with established vendors in the transportation field who have extensive experience in the business of transporting passengers.
 
Are the communities safe?

Before entering a community, the GB Research and Evaluation (R&E) team collects baseline data, assesses community needs and secures buy-in from the local leadership. Each community is visited by the Executive Director and transport/logistics team of the GB in-country team to ensure that it is secure and safe for transporting the volunteers to and from the community. If the GB in-country leadership team ever feels that the safety of volunteers is compromised in any way, volunteers would be immediately withdrawn from the community.

 

How accessible are the communities?

All communities must be accessible through paved roads or well maintained dirt roads (used mostly during summer) by normal vehicles or four wheel drive. The driving time to the location is approximately 30 minutes to 3 hours from where the volunteers are staying.

Has there ever been any security related incident?

Global Brigades has an exceptional track record for brigade security because of the involvement of local law enforcement, hired security, and strong relationships with local communities leaders. Groups have only experienced incidents typical of any international travel, such as petty theft. Any and all incidents are recorded taken note of for improvements to safety. Terrorist or guerrilla groups are not present in the communities served and no Global Brigades group has been threatened by them.

 

Are the students ever alone?

Students are never left alone; they have GB staff members accompanying them and are told to never wander off alone. During the last day of the brigade the groups may have the option to visit a tourist town to purchase souvenirs and have lunch. Here, the students are always instructed to stay within the town and to always be with a group.

What if the group has to be evacuated?

In the event the volunteers must be evacuated, there is an established Emergency Evacuation Plan in place. All volunteers are covered by the GB Emergency Evacuation Insurance Policy. The in-country Program Associates will work with the Brigade Coordinators, local embassy, and airlines to ensure that the group departs immediately and safely.

Who do I contact in case of an emergency?

If there is an emergency situation where the family needs to get a hold of the volunteer immediately, please contact the appropriate team members listed below:

 

Emergency Travel Contact:

• GB International Office, during business hours, 1-206-489-4798, or email admin@globalbrigades.org

• For after-hour support, please contact the on-call Chapter Advisor at 1-206-596-0014 (for urgent matters only)

 

Honduran Contacts:

• Quique Rodriguez –Chief Executive Officer of Global Brigades Honduras, +504-9970-9478 (Honduran Mobile)

• Luis Quan – Chief Operations Officer of Global Brigades Honduras, +504-9488-7997 (Honduran Mobile)

 

Panama Contact:

• Gabriela Valencia - Chief Executive Officer of Global Brigades Panama, +507-6083-1756 (Panamanian Mobile)

 

Nicaragua Contacts:

• Mario Quan - Interim Executive Director of Global Brigades Nicaragua, +505-5842-3566 (Nicaraguan Mobile)

• Wilmer Arostegui - Operations Director of Global Brigades Nicaragua, +505-8539-5320 (Nicaraguan Mobile)

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