Empowered Community

Congratulations El Ojochal!

712

Brigade Volunteers

2193

Medical Patient Consultations

173

Dental Patient Consultations

252

People with Access to Clean Water

93

Loans Disbursed

43

Eco-Stoves Constructed

44

Latrines Constructed

73

Trained Community Leaders

El Ojochal

  • Overview
  • Medical
  • Dental
  • Engineering
  • Water
  • Business
  • Public Health

Overview

El Ojochal is a community with a population of about 250 people living in roughly 65 homes. It is an extremely rocky community, belonging to the municipality of Amapala in the department of Valle. El Ojochal is primarily an agricultural community, mainly harvesting corn and melons. A large percentage of the community works on nearby shrimp farms, although this work is generally seasonal; it is not steady employment. There is a primary school offering classes from kindergarten to sixth grade, and there is a Water Council, Basic Sanitation Committee, and community bank.

Municipality: Teupasenti
Department: El Paraiso

Homes : 65
Population : 252
Water System : Yes
Community Bank : Yes
Electricity : Yes
Health Center : Coyolito, 2 km away
Community Health Workers : Yes
% of Homes with Latrines : 100%
Education : Up to 6th Grade
Distance from Lodging Facility : 30 minutes

Medical

Program Status

  • Planning
  • Active
  • Complete

HEALTH CARE ACCESS:

The nearest health center from El Ojochal is about 2 kilometers away in a community called El Coyolito. For many health needs, community members must travel about an hour away to a hospital in San Lorenzo. Since most people do not have vehicles, they must travel by a bus that comes to the community.  Given the distance from the nearest health facilities, El Ojochal is a community that can especially benefit from the Community Health Workers Program.

98

Brigade Volunteers

2193

Patients Attended

197

Pap Smears Performed

69

Health Education Workshops


COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKERS:

The CHW program in El Ojochal began in 2014, after the water, public health, microfinance, and architecture programs had already completed their projects in the community. There are a total of 25 CHWs currently working in El Ojochal.  El Ojochal is a part of a larger area that includes 16 smaller communities, with El Ojochal
being the centralized location.  Therefore, a total of 25 Community Health Workers were trained in El Ojochal, reaching 16 different communities, and over 2,500 people.

The Community Health Workers help to provide basic medical attention in the absence of a health center.  Additionally, medical supplies that we are able to give to the Community Health Workers can help fill the need for medical supplies that the government is not able to provide. The most common health problems in El Ojochal are intestinal parasites, respiratory infections, and malnutrition.  Community Health Workers in El Ojochal help to treat and prevent these illnesses, and address other health topics such as first aid, caring for pregnancies, and first response in emergency situations.

 

BRIGADE INFORMATION:

Medical and Dental brigades use the local school as their brigade site. The school has 2 rooms and one for the kindergarten, where the various medical stations are conducted. Doctors spend an average of 10 minutes with each patient and we are able to provide 4-5 educational charlas a day.  Each brigade sees an average of 532 patients per brigade.

  • AVERAGE PATIENTS ATTENDED: 532
  • NEARBY COMMUNITIES: PINTADILLERA, PLAYA BLANCA, LA GUAYABA, GAVIOTA, EL SOPE, LOS LANGUES, COYOLITO, EL OCOTE
  • BRIGADE SITE: SCHOOL

MEDICAL BRIGADES IN EL OJOCHAL:

Chapter Date # Of Volunteers Chapter Date # Of Volunteers
University of Missouri May 2012 34 Loyola University January 2013 29
Imperial College of London September 2013 48 Maryville University May 2014 22

Dental

Program Status

  • Planning
  • Active
  • Complete

DENTAL CARE ACCESS

In working closely with the medical program, the dental program provides fillings, extractions, and fluoride treatments as a standard part of medical brigades. Most community members do not have regular access to dental care due to the lack of dentist within a reasonable distance.

173

Patient Consultations

371

Fluoride Treatments

105

Fillings Performed

20

Dental Education Workshops

BRIGADE INFORMATION:

Medical and Dental brigades use the local school as their brigade site. The school has 2 rooms and one for the kindergarten, where the various medical stations are conducted. Doctors spend an average of 10 minutes with each patient and we are able to provide 4-5 educational charlas a day.  Each brigade sees an average of 532 patients per brigade.

  • AVERAGE PATIENTS ATTENDED: 532
  • NEARBY COMMUNITIES: PINTADILLERA, PLAYA BLANCA, LA GUAYABA, GAVIOTA, EL SOPE, LOS LANGUES, COYOLITO, EL OCOTE
  • BRIGADE SITE: SCHOOL

MEDICAL BRIGADES IN EL OJOCHAL:

Chapter Date # Of Volunteers Chapter Date # Of Volunteers
University of Missouri May 2012 34 Loyola University January 2013 29
Imperial College of London September 2013 48 Maryville University May 2014 22

Engineering

Program Status

  • Planning
  • Active
  • Complete

EL OJOCHAL’S ENGINEERING CHALLENGE:

El Ojochal never had a centralized water system providing an adequate supply of clean water to all members of the community. Prior to Global Brigades’ arrival, there was a water system, however, just twelve houses were connected to the system and it only functioned sporadically. Community members had also attempted to build a well to increase the supply of water in the community, however, they could not find water despite digging approximately 40 meters below the surface. Therefore, community members had to walk for upwards of one hour on a rocky path to arrive at the nearest water source and then carry the water home in containers. Given that each person can only carry a certain quantity of water, most reported walking to the water source several times per day. During the dry season, the trip was often even longer as the closest sources would dry-up. Regardless of how where they found water, there was no central treatment and few families treat the drinking water within their homes, increasing the risk of waterborne disease.

NA

Brigade Volunteers

252

Beneficiaries

3.1

Kilometers of PIpeline Designed

NA

Average Community Volunteers

EL OJOCHAL’S ENGINEERING SOLUTION:

Water Brigaders from eleven different universities worked in El Ojochal between December 2013 and February 2014. During that time, student volunteers worked with community members to:
• Drill an 85-foot deep well, providing access to 200 gallons of water per minute
• Install a pump to send water from the source to the storage and chlorination tanks
• Install roughly 2,500 meters of pipeline forming the distribution network
• Build a 10,000 gallon storage tank
• Install water connections to all houses
• Provide educational workshops to children in the community’s primary school on water and health related topics.

In addition to conducting workshops in El Ojochal’s primary school, we work to ensure project sustainability through educating the community about water conservation and good hygiene practices. Student volunteers on Water Brigades have also collaborated with students on Public Health Brigades to host a Health and Hygiene fair in January 2014. During the extremely successful event, community members and their children visited a variety of booths designed to teach them about hygiene and sanitation. To ensure the sustainability of the project, a Water Council was established and trained by Water Brigades in addition to a Basic Sanitation Committee also trained by Water Brigades.

Water

Program Status

  • Planning
  • Active
  • Complete

EL OJOCHAL’S WATER CHALLENGE:

El Ojochal never had a centralized water system providing an adequate supply of clean water to all members of the community. Prior to Global Brigades’ arrival, there was a water system, however, just twelve houses were connected to the system and it only functioned sporadically. Community members had also attempted to build a well to increase the supply of water in the community, however, they could not find water despite digging approximately 40 meters below the surface. Therefore, community members had to walk for upwards of one hour on a rocky path to arrive at the nearest water source and then carry the water home in containers. Given that each person can only carry a certain quantity of water, most reported walking to the water source several times per day. During the dry season, the trip was often even longer as the closest sources would dry-up. Regardless of how where they found water, there was no central treatment and few families treat the drinking water within their homes, increasing the risk of waterborne disease.

124

Brigade Volunteers

252

Project Beneficiaries

3.1

Kilometers of Pipeline Installed

10,000

Storage Tank Volume (gallons)

EL OJOCHAL’S WATER SOLUTION:

Water Brigaders from eleven different universities worked in El Ojochal between December 2013 and February 2014. During that time, student volunteers worked with community members to:
• Drill an 85-foot deep well providing access to 200 gallons of water per per minute
• Install a pump to send water from the source to the storage and chlorination tanks
• Install roughly 2,500 meters of pipeline forming the distribution network
• Build a 10,000 gallon storage tank
• Install water connections to all houses
• Provide educational workshops to children in the community’s primary school on water and health related topics.

In addition to conducting workshops in El Ojochal’s primary school in order to ensure project sustainability by education the community about water usage and basic hygiene, student volunteers on Water Brigades also worked with students on Public Health Brigades to host a Health and Hygiene fair in January 2014. During the extremely successful event, community members and their children visited a variety of booths designed to teach them about hygiene and sanitation. To ensure the sustainability of the project, a Water Council was established and trained by Water Brigades in addition to a Basic Sanitation Committee also trained by Water Brigades.

WATER BRIGADES IN THE COMMUNITY:

Chapter Date # Of Volunteers Chapter Date # Of Volunteers
DePaul University December 2013 18 University of Virginia January 2014 12
Johns Hopkins University January 2014 3 Austin January 2014 9
St. Louis University January 2014 21 University of Rochester January 2014 8
UC Berkley January 2014 5 Boston University January 2014 7
Rutgers University January 2014 11 University of Victoria February 2014 12
Mount Allison University February 2014 19

Business

Program Status

  • Planning
  • Active
  • Complete

El OJOCHAL’S ECONOMIC CHALLENGE

The people of El Ojochal are hard working and engaged in a variety of economic activities to be able to maintain their families. Most households have their own small plot of land where they grow corn and beans, which they keep for their households as their main source of nourishment. Many community members work by the day for the standard pay of HNL 100 (around USD 4.25) as masons or workers on others’ land, but this is far from representing a stable and predictable source of income. A small minority of community members are able to obtain seasonal jobs in the neighboring shrimp processing factories or work as cooks or waiters in the restaurants located in the nearby beaches. Nevertheless, most households struggle to make a living.

51

Brigade Volunteers

93

Loans Disbursed

20

Savings Accounts Opened

3600

Capital Investment

EL OJOCHAL’S MICROFINANCE SOLUTION

El Ojochal was the eighth community the Microfinance Program in Honduras expanded to in June 2013. The Microfinance Brigades in-country team and brigaders from many universities have worked in this community since then. During this time, staff and volunteers have worked with community members to:

  • Train and establish a Community Rural Bank (Caja Rural)
  • Provide educational seminars to adults and children in the community on the importance of savings
  • Promote voluntary savings in the community to reach a level of sustainable capital for the Caja
  • Door-to-door community visits to further encourage community members to trust the community bank and open accounts to actively save
  • Provide community-wide workshops to sensitize community members about the importance of creditworthiness and reliability in repaying loans
  • Door-to-door community visits to teach the basics of household budgeting and accounting to families and women
  • Concede loans to all Public Health beneficiaries to finance the completion of the projects
  • Concede loans to the beneficiaries of home renovations through what was the Architecture Program, to finance the completion of the projects

 

EL OJOCHAL’S BUSINESS SOLUTION

Through the leadership and structure of the community bank, El Ojochal has an agricultural store where framers can buy and sell basic grains and agricultural supplies. Because El Ojochal and surrounding communities are economically dependent upon agriculture, the store provides a sustainable method for them to buy and sell their own seeds, fertilizers, supplies, and crops. Producers benefit from this business because they often can not transport their own crop to the nearest market, and have to sell it to middle men at artificially low prices. Consumers benefit as well because they usually have to travel to the nearest town to buy fertilizers, pesticides, seeds, and other supplies.

BUSINESS BRIGADES IN EL OJOCHAL:

Chapter Date # Of Volunteers Chapter Date # Of Volunteers
DePaul University December 2013 10 University of North Carolina & University of Virginia March 2014 15
DePaul University March 2014 10 University of Calgary April 2016 16

Public Health

Program Status

  • Planning
  • Active
  • Complete

EL OJOCHAL’S PUBLIC HEALTH CHALLENGE

Many community members in El Ojochal lacked the resources needed to improve their homes and prevent diseases caused by unsafe living environments.  Prior to the arrival of the Public Health Brigades in 2013, most homes lacked latrines and showers, forcing community members to relieve themselves and bathe outside. Similarly, most community members could not safely store their water, which increased the risk of waterborne disease.  Posing another risk for community members’ health, the majority of homes had dirt floors and traditional stoves, resulting in both parasitic infections such as Chagas Disease and respiratory problems.

439

Brigade Volunteers

48

Eco-Stoves Constructed

49

Latrines Constructed

75

Floors Constructed

EL OJOCHAL’S PUBLIC HEALTH SOLUTION

Public Health Brigaders from several different universities and the Public Health Brigades in-country team worked in El Ojochal from June 2013 – April 2014. During this time, volunteers and staff members worked with community members to:

  • Identify community leaders and train them to form the Basic Sanitation Committee
  • Increase cultural sensitivity and awareness by working side by side with qualified masons and project beneficiaries
  • Build eco-stoves, latrines, hygiene stations, and hundreds of square meters of cement floor
  • Conduct educational workshops emphasizing the importance of sanitation and hygiene in local primary schools

 

To ensure the sustainability of the in-home infrastructure projects, the Public Health Program provides continuous follow-up in the community. It also forms and trains the Basic Sanitation Committee, a community body formed by local leaders which is entitled to monitor the correct utilization and maintenance of the infrastructures. Clear responsibilities and powers are assigned to each member, making the beneficiaries themselves an even stronger stakeholder of the Public Health projects.

PUBLIC HEALTH BRIGADES IN THE COMMUNITY:

Chapter Date # Of Volunteers Chapter Date # Of Volunteers
University of Washington June 2013 15 UC San Diego June 2013 25
DePaul University June 2013 7 Wayne State August 2013 13
Greater Piedmont / UC Berkely Post Bacc August 2013 12 Explore Honduras / University of Houston August 2013 12
Imperial College of London September 2013 49 DePaul University December 2013 19
University of Illinois Chicago December 2013 40 UNC Wilmington December 2014 4
St. Louis University January 2014 21 Brandeis Unversity January 2014 13
Albion College January 2014 16 Harvard University January 2014 32
St. Olaf University February 2014 16 College of William & Mary March 2014 1
Indiana University March 2014 2 University of Arizona March 2014 1
Acadia University April 2014 3

Local Reference Points

View the map to see the closest volunteer lodging facilities, hospitals, and other relevant points of reference.

  • Feature